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In Vogue

A confession: I don’t always buy Vogue. Not every month. Much as I love flicking through its shiny pages, I’m lazy – and the cover price puts me off. I realise that, as a journalist, I should be flying the flag for splashing out your cash on print media, but I also live in the real world and £4.00 for a magazine still takes me aback (although I’ll happily pay £6.75 for a weak and overpriced cocktail…sorry I digress).

Anyway, the one volume of the year I never miss is the September issue. As per the excellent documentary of the same name, the September issue is the most important edition of the year. I proper love drinking in the trends that will be big news throughout the autumn and winter and raiding my wardrobe for the old faithful items that can be resurrected to slip into this season’s
collection.

As for the the forthcoming freeze, well, you can keep your minimals (yawn) but I was most thrilled to see, in addition to the return of the camel coat, so much 50s influenced fashion sandwiched in those pristine pages.

50s fashion is incredibly dear to womankind. The classic, Dior princess line makes you feel glam and feminine whatever the occasion and full, A line skirts do wonders for any waistline, making the most of your hips instead of drawing attention to your muffin top. I could live in 50s fashion. In fact, I’ll be doing the ironing in a prom dress and knee-highs before the summer’s out, I promise.

This turn of fashion events means that my ancient (to the tune of a decade) Ted Baker pleated, A line, lace-layered wonder-skirt proudly went back into circulation on Saturday night. And the even better news is that 50s fashion makes it utterly acceptable – no, desirable – to team sky high heels with socks. I can’t tell you how happy this makes me; I can actually enjoy tallness without blisters. And walk in heels without looking like a man in drag. Joy!

I went straight to TK Maxx to buy cream ankle socks with pink ribbons (they are nicer than they sound) to team with pink caged heels and the aforementioned skirt. Add a nude/beige body (nudes are going through to autumn with more of a bronze/brown touch than the blushes of summer), lace ruffled belt and cropped shrug and you’ll get at least three (count ’em!) compliments from absolute strangers. This makes JoJo a very happy Fashion Detective.

To get the look before anyone else on your block does, start searching the rails for 50’s inspired dresses and skirts with that essential A line – and to really hit trend, look for pieces to combine your 50s vibe with the lace, ruffles and corsets we discussed last week.

To get your juices flowing (!), I’m loving the sorrows dress from All Saints – which is in the sale (!!), so act fast. Ideally, you’re looking for a knee length, or even mid-calf dress, but this bandeau prom dress by Oasis would look cute with white, lace socks and black heels (as per the pic above).

Another Oasis dress that has totally got it going on is the lace prom dress in camel and black – but it is pipped to the post in the 50s style stakes by the V front printed 50s dress just in at Warehouse.

It’s nice to see that Ted Baker can still rock the 50s look – adoring their printed wrap dress – and you’ve gotta love the purple prom dress by Phase Eight at Debenhams.

If you’re going for a skirt and corset (or body) consider Uttam’s Jesse skirt which ticks the boxes for late summer and Dotty P’s mocha lace print skirt is shorter than I’d like but if your legs are long then work it, baby. Winner of this category is Ben De Lisi whose grey stripe pattern mid-length skirt at Debenhams is well tidy.

As for the socks and shoes, there are tons of lace, frill and bow topped socks on the high street (ankle or knee length should depend on the length of your hem) and match them wantonly with 50s inspired sky high heels (peep toes work particularly well).

Now all you need to do is channel your inner Joan Holloway and you won’t even care that the summer is coming to an end.

Prada’s fall collection is something beautiful to aspire to, ladies

Written by Johanna Payton